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BLOT3606 2In My Eyes è un foglio A3 ripiegato su se stesso. Dentro ci sono fotografie analogiche scattate più o meno lontano da casa, più o meno lontano nel tempo. E anche qualche parola.

In My Eyes nasce dalla stanchezza dello schermo e dalla ripresa dei sensi.

Dopo anni passati a scansionare e pubblicare fotografie su blog più o meno effimeri ho sentito la necessità di vederle stampate su carta, di poterle annusare, toccare, strappare e magari, bruciare. L’ispirazione è arrivata da Chiara Mirelli e l’impaginazione da Andre (shrtwvs), la stampa invece da una piccola tipografia di Aosta (Il Timbro). Questo è quanto: pellicole, carta e inchiostro.

In My Eyes la trovi ovunque e da nessuna parte. Non ha una distribuzione se non i miei spostamenti e le mie finanze.

Luca

In My Eyes is an A3 sheet, folded back on itself. Inside there are analog photos, shot more or less away from home, more or less far in time. And some words as well.

In My Eyes is born from screen fatigue and the recovery of the senses.

After years spent scanning and posting photos on blogs more or less ephemeral, I felt the need to see them printed on paper, being able to smell them, touch them, rip them and maybe even burn them.

Inspiration came from Chiara Mirelli and the layout from Andre (shrtwvs), while printing is from a small printshop in Aosta (Il Timbro). This is it: films, paper and ink.

You can find In My Eyes everywhere and nowhere. It has no distribution but my own travelling and finances.

Luca

BLOT5338When I was a kid I used to go for a bike ride with my dad on fire roads up the mountains, sometimes to go at a refuge, or most likely for the will of discovering new places and just having some breaths of nice and fresh mountain air. We used to say we go for some mountain-biking. Nowadays we call this “Enduro” biking, but that’s about the same old thing. Since when I got into this “new” discipline, I heard from a lot of riders talking about this Invergneux pass, and everyone seemed so stoked about it, literally saying that was THE one track you must ride in Aosta Valley. So finally some weeks ago I decided to go up there and try it with my mate Zac. We decided to start just after lunch. Go to the Invergneux pass means that you have to cross 2 different valleys. Starting from Lillaz, you reach the Urtier Valley where you e meet a couple of donkeys, some chickens and a lot of cows. You then have to reach the pass, pushing the bike, and figuring out what you are leaving behind you, the sight can now spread in every direction, the only minus being the powerlines that cross the valley. The climb continues, over the last rocky slope, culminating at 2906 meters. On top, a couple of pictures are a must, a little grappa drink gives you a bit of heat and you are ready to head down the Grauson Valley. The first part is just epic, you wish it would never end, surrounded by wonderful meadows, in which you feel so small trying to conquer them on your little bicycles, and so you keep on riding down, the valley get wider and wider, until it becomes narrow again toward the end of it. If I think now of all the sweat to go up the pass, and what I enjoyied on the ride down, i feel a big smile coming upon my face, thinking, yes, all those rumors about Invergneux pass were right! We are almost down and the light is fading away, it’s getting late, we reach back to the village of Gimillan that it is almost 8 pm; the only bar in the village is already closed, that could sound strange, but up here the tourists shall already go to bed at that time!

More here: VDAmonamour.

via aostavalleyfreeride.com

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BLOT3802The summer is almost gone on the high pastures of Aosta Valley, but down on the plains people is still suffering from the season’s heat. Up here everything changes towards the end of august, and all the colors turn to brown, yellow and red. The air, except during the central hours, becomes sharp as soon as the smallest breeze comes up. But the biggest change in the impressions and sensations is given by the sunlight, which is now much lower than in the mid-summer and builds up lights and shadows on our path and on the side of the mountains. And we talk about a path even if we’re pedalling up there, because it almost seems to hear the footsteps of a millennial tradition, a pilgrimage that goes along the same path that today bikers, runners and trekkers, they all follow to get on top of Punta Chaligne. It is believed that the pilgrimage that takes place up here every 16th of August, starting at 4 am at the church of Gignod, has started during the first half of the 17th century, when european and alpine populations where killed in masses by the bubonic plague.
The reach of the magnificent cross located on the top of Punta Chaligne is way faster on a mountain-bike than during the pilgrimage, also because you can start the tour from the village of Buthier at 1350m. and the trail that climbs from there gently goes all the way up to the Chaligne refuge first and up to the Alpe Chaligne Farms at 2234m. after. A stop at the Chaligne refuge is almost a must (if you are not on an athletic stress with chrono and cardio on) and you can be delighted with exquisite typical foods and local wines; moreover it’s really interesting to see how nicely the architecture of the newly rebuilt refuge was taken into account, standing together with the local farms and pastures in such a lovely and respectful way. Entering the refuge is always warming and charming, the staff is lovely and the fireplace will give the magic touch to the experience. Once back on track, the last bit of the trail, to reach the Col de Metz at 2487 m. has to be climbed with the bike on your shoulders, almost to remember you the pilgrimage spirit of that ascent. From here the downhill trail options are countless and the best choice is to have a guide with you, or at least have a good map of the area: the reward is guaranteed, and the images can tell it!

More here: VDAmonamour.

via aostavalleyfreeride.com

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001659210010Ad agosto duemilaquindici sono stato in Sardegna. La mia prima volta sull’Isola risale a vent’anni fa o giù di lì. Mi ricordo tre cose: il villaggio turistico, il buffet del villaggio turistico e la sede del Partito Comunista (fuori dal villaggio turistico). La mia seconda volta risale a un mese fa e i ricordi sono più presenti, un pò come quando passi da Devendra Banhart ai Guano Padano. Per esempio mi ricordo di un tramonto dal finestrino, di tapparelle abbassate e di banchetti prelibati. Di un albero bellissimo, lì, nella sabbia dei turisti fatta di umani lucidi e prove costume ormai al tracollo, che comunque il più bello lì era proprio lui, e poi un’altro tramonto, onde, grotte, buoi, pecore, cancelli e vigne. Di Natura e profumi. Mi ricordo di strade. Di un mirto velenoso e di un paese scontroso. Di sedie isolate. Di un’atelier dove tutto era corrente, incoerente ma disarmante. Di una Lancia Fulvia 1.3 messa lì che sembrava uscita dal concessionario, nel millenovecentosettantatre. Mi ricordo di un’ospitalità rara ed infine di una casa che se non la vedi non ci credi e che poi quando la vedi, cazzo quando la vedi ti sembra di non aver visto altro, o quasi, e la guardi pensando che se l’arte per esser tale conviene che sia inutile, necessita comunque di un’eccezione.

Hasselblad 500 cm + Kodak Trix 400 + Fuji Provia 400X + Fujifilm x100s

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001649990003“A San Luréns l’ua la tens”, ovvero, per la festività di San Lorenzo (10 agosto) l’uva incomincia a mostrare qua e là qualche acino colorato, il che significa che l’annata prossima sarà ottima, o così parrebbe. Per togliere i dubbi a fine luglio Alice e Vinz si sono sposati, circondati di colori, tannini e tabacco (e piante di pomodori). Tanti auguri a loro per questa e per tutte le annate venture, colorate e millesimate! Noi, i festeggianti, siamo rimasti con loro qualche giorno, giusto per essere sicuri dei colori e perchè di tannini così, raramente se ne incontrano, ma questa è un’altra storia, Sauvages!

Hasselblad 500 cm + Nikon EM + Kodak Trix 400 + Fujifilm x100s

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BLOT1690Aosta is a town in the heart of the small region of Aosta Valley, that has many reasons to be considered one of the most fascinating bike detinations of the Alps. In the last years it seems to have  become one of the most renowed bike destinations of all europe for the most demanding riders from all Europe. So first Aosta’s position right in the center of the region, makes it a top spot to reach all the different spots around the valley in less than one hour of driving. Then, even tough the smaller villages and resorts may surely be of charm, biking just outside of town into endless woods and untouched nature, and being able to get back on the bike to local food and wine places downtown, cultural offers and the amazing roman architecture of the town, is quite a unique experience. Not to be forgot, the climate of the bottom of the valley, makes it possible to ride for a very long period (march to november) in opposition of the higher routes which can only be accessed for 2 or 3 months during summer. Just outside of town Aosta offers dozens of wonderful singletracks, and even a downhill track comes down to town from the Pila Bike park. For the less extreme riders, the wineyards in the surroundings of Aosta are surely a first choice, with the posibility to taste local wines in the cellars of local winemakers. So here are some pictures of a week end of early summer on the trails between Gressan and Saint Pierre area that has once again suggested to us: we live in Bike paradise!

More here: VDAmonamour.

via aostavalleyfreeride.com

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