BLOT3606 2In My Eyes è un foglio A3 ripiegato su se stesso. Dentro ci sono fotografie analogiche scattate più o meno lontano da casa, più o meno lontano nel tempo. E anche qualche parola.

In My Eyes nasce dalla stanchezza dello schermo e dalla ripresa dei sensi.

Dopo anni passati a scansionare e pubblicare fotografie su blog più o meno effimeri ho sentito la necessità di vederle stampate su carta, di poterle annusare, toccare, strappare e magari, bruciare. L’ispirazione è arrivata da Chiara Mirelli e l’impaginazione da Andre (shrtwvs), la stampa invece da una piccola tipografia di Aosta (Il Timbro). Questo è quanto: pellicole, carta e inchiostro.

In My Eyes la trovi ovunque e da nessuna parte. Non ha una distribuzione se non i miei spostamenti e le mie finanze.

Luca

In My Eyes is an A3 sheet, folded back on itself. Inside there are analog photos, shot more or less away from home, more or less far in time. And some words as well.

In My Eyes is born from screen fatigue and the recovery of the senses.

After years spent scanning and posting photos on blogs more or less ephemeral, I felt the need to see them printed on paper, being able to smell them, touch them, rip them and maybe even burn them.

Inspiration came from Chiara Mirelli and the layout from Andre (shrtwvs), while printing is from a small printshop in Aosta (Il Timbro). This is it: films, paper and ink.

You can find In My Eyes everywhere and nowhere. It has no distribution but my own travelling and finances.

Luca

001697060032Sono pieno di input. Da Mark Lanegan alla barba che ho tagliato da qualche ora. E amici, cantanti, conoscenti e facinorosi. Cinici. La sera rimane un bel momento della giornata, anche se l’ora di luce serve più dopo che prima. Genova mi fa venire in mente la parola sicurezza. Quella che nel 2001 è venuta meno, quella che da un colore vuole essere rappresentata, quella che ci propinano dall’alto, quella che fa fare plastici e proclami, quella che rende le persone almeno dignitose, almeno per qualche minuto, almeno agli occhi celati. Che siate stramaledetti, voi e la vostra ignoranza da centro commerciale, voi e la vostra sicurezza da undici settembre, le vostre felpe toponimiche, le vostre bandiere tricolori, le frasi fatte e quelle da fare, il Capodanno e i mercatini di Natale. Che siate stramaledetti insieme alle vostre scuole di politica, alle vostre aspirazioni, ai vostri tifi da stadio, alle vostre motoseghe facili e alle vostre seghe incompiute, ai vostri mi piace e agli autoscatti, e ai vostri cazzo di confini. Non ci meritiamo niente, perché anche niente sarebbe eccessivo. Genova ti mette in soggezione e ti accoglie, nonostante le opere inutili e i fiumi dirottati. Genova è bella come la ragazza delle medie, è elegante come sua madre. Genova è (in)consapevole e grande come poche. Genova è fantastica. Tutto il resto l’ha già detto De Andrè.

Canon Eos 1n + Fuji Superia X-TRA 400

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BLOT5338When I was a kid I used to go for a bike ride with my dad on fire roads up the mountains, sometimes to go at a refuge, or most likely for the will of discovering new places and just having some breaths of nice and fresh mountain air. We used to say we go for some mountain-biking. Nowadays we call this “Enduro” biking, but that’s about the same old thing. Since when I got into this “new” discipline, I heard from a lot of riders talking about this Invergneux pass, and everyone seemed so stoked about it, literally saying that was THE one track you must ride in Aosta Valley. So finally some weeks ago I decided to go up there and try it with my mate Zac. We decided to start just after lunch. Go to the Invergneux pass means that you have to cross 2 different valleys. Starting from Lillaz, you reach the Urtier Valley where you e meet a couple of donkeys, some chickens and a lot of cows. You then have to reach the pass, pushing the bike, and figuring out what you are leaving behind you, the sight can now spread in every direction, the only minus being the powerlines that cross the valley. The climb continues, over the last rocky slope, culminating at 2906 meters. On top, a couple of pictures are a must, a little grappa drink gives you a bit of heat and you are ready to head down the Grauson Valley. The first part is just epic, you wish it would never end, surrounded by wonderful meadows, in which you feel so small trying to conquer them on your little bicycles, and so you keep on riding down, the valley get wider and wider, until it becomes narrow again toward the end of it. If I think now of all the sweat to go up the pass, and what I enjoyied on the ride down, i feel a big smile coming upon my face, thinking, yes, all those rumors about Invergneux pass were right! We are almost down and the light is fading away, it’s getting late, we reach back to the village of Gimillan that it is almost 8 pm; the only bar in the village is already closed, that could sound strange, but up here the tourists shall already go to bed at that time!

More here: VDAmonamour.

via aostavalleyfreeride.com

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001674040025Oppure la rivincita della Mju. Persa, dozzine di giorni fa in uno squallido locale di un’incompiuta cittadina, ricomprata poi dal buon amico Matteo per poche lire e caricata di 36 pose per questa prima uscita informale al Bivacco Regondi, insieme a Rolli e quattro tedeschi incontrati lassù. Poche parole e tanti silenzi, desiderati. E poi questi scherzi dell’iridescenza, che alla temporanea perfezione del digitale ci fanno un baffo, ma un baffo importante, tipo quelli di Salvador. Ho messo anche quelle fotografie in questo “articolo”, perchè chi ha occhi possa accorgersi dell’imperfezione della perfezione, scusate la replica. Comunque la Mju è una macchina fotografica e queste fotografie, perdonate la pretesa, vorrei dedicarle alla fragilità dell’uomo, che possa ricordarsi sempre di quel nove ottobre 1963, di quello stupro ostentato e di quella memoria troppo spesso dimenticata. E alla bellezza delle pellicola, che mi coglie sempre impreparato. E anche un pò a Nick, Let Love In, mofos!

Olympus mju + Fuji Superia X-TRA 400 + Fujifilm x100s

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BLOT3802The summer is almost gone on the high pastures of Aosta Valley, but down on the plains people is still suffering from the season’s heat. Up here everything changes towards the end of august, and all the colors turn to brown, yellow and red. The air, except during the central hours, becomes sharp as soon as the smallest breeze comes up. But the biggest change in the impressions and sensations is given by the sunlight, which is now much lower than in the mid-summer and builds up lights and shadows on our path and on the side of the mountains. And we talk about a path even if we’re pedalling up there, because it almost seems to hear the footsteps of a millennial tradition, a pilgrimage that goes along the same path that today bikers, runners and trekkers, they all follow to get on top of Punta Chaligne. It is believed that the pilgrimage that takes place up here every 16th of August, starting at 4 am at the church of Gignod, has started during the first half of the 17th century, when european and alpine populations where killed in masses by the bubonic plague.
The reach of the magnificent cross located on the top of Punta Chaligne is way faster on a mountain-bike than during the pilgrimage, also because you can start the tour from the village of Buthier at 1350m. and the trail that climbs from there gently goes all the way up to the Chaligne refuge first and up to the Alpe Chaligne Farms at 2234m. after. A stop at the Chaligne refuge is almost a must (if you are not on an athletic stress with chrono and cardio on) and you can be delighted with exquisite typical foods and local wines; moreover it’s really interesting to see how nicely the architecture of the newly rebuilt refuge was taken into account, standing together with the local farms and pastures in such a lovely and respectful way. Entering the refuge is always warming and charming, the staff is lovely and the fireplace will give the magic touch to the experience. Once back on track, the last bit of the trail, to reach the Col de Metz at 2487 m. has to be climbed with the bike on your shoulders, almost to remember you the pilgrimage spirit of that ascent. From here the downhill trail options are countless and the best choice is to have a guide with you, or at least have a good map of the area: the reward is guaranteed, and the images can tell it!

More here: VDAmonamour.

via aostavalleyfreeride.com

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